Following your injection

Following anti-VEGF injection
What can you do to help make the treatment a success?
What are the risks and complications?

 

Following anti-VEGF injection

You will be given an antibiotic eye drop and detailed instructions on how to care for your eye.

The white of your eye is likely to be red where the injection went in. This is common and will gradually fade. You may also see floaters or “spots” in your vision. These are normal and should go away in a few days. You may return to your usual daily activities as soon as you feel ready to do so.

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What can you do to help make the treatment a success?

It is very important that you instil the eye drops as instructed, as this will help prevent infection in the eye.

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What are the risks and complications?

The aim and potential outcome of anti-VEGF injection treatments for wet AMD will be discussed with you in clinic and prior to your procedure.

Our team operates from modern private hospitals where the equipment and products used are of the highest standard. Every effort is made to minimise risk and ensure your procedure is safe.

Serious problems during or after treatment are rare, however every procedure has risks and potential complications.

Complications early in your recovery

  • Endophthalmitis. Infection in the eye is a very rare but potentially devastating complication affecting less than one in a thousand cases. Increasing discomfort, increasing redness of the eye or worsening discharge should be reported immediately.

  • Allergy to eye drops. Ocular allergy typically causes lid swelling, itching or redness. If this happens, please let us know and we can prescribe an alternative. Some patients are allergic to the preservative used in eye drops and if you have previously had a reaction, please inform us prior to treatment so that we can prescribe a preservative-free option.

Complications late in your recovery

  • Retinal detachment. This is a sight-threatening condition in which the retina becomes separated from the inner wall of the eye. In most cases the retina can be re-attached and vision restored, but action should be taken promptly. Any increase in floaters and flashing lights, or the appearance of a shadow spreading inwards from the edge of vision, should be reported urgently.

  • Dry eyes. This is a common symptom with increasing age, for which many sufferers use simple lubricating drops. Interfering with the conjunctiva on the surface of the eye can upset the production of mucus, which is an important constituent of the tear film. In most cases this is temporary, responding to simple measures such as ocular lubricants and warm compress bathing. We will advise you on a treatment regime if required.

Information explaining how to care for your eye together with contact telephone numbers will be given to you on discharge from hospital.

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